“IS THE LORD AMONG US OR NOT?”

This meditation is based on a sermon posted online during a Sunday service of Morning Prayer at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Arlington, Virginia on the Third Sunday of Lent, March 12, 2020. 

Photo by Gretchen Seelenbinder on Unsplash

On the first Sunday of Lent it is a custom in the Episcopal Church to chant the Great Litany in procession. In light of the spread of the Covid-19 virus, now officially is designated as a global pandemic, one phrase from the Litany stands out:

Litanist:  “[F]rom plague, pestilence, and famine…”

Response: “Good Lord, deliver us.”

These words first appeared in The Great Litany of the 1549 Book of Common Prayer, produced by Archbishop Thomas Cramner from earlier Latin rites and other existing liturgies from Germany and England.

The Great Litany appeared in 16th Century when people were ignorant about viruses and bacteria and how they worked.  They didn’t know how illness spread. The plague had killed many people in Europe in the centuries prior to the 16th, so people were fearful whenever a disease, cold, or flu began to spread.

Today we know much more about how viruses and bacteria spread, but when we can’t control it or immunize against it, we also are full of fear. That is the case today. Many of us are fearful of what might happen to us, and not knowing what will happen, we feel powerless in the face of it. In the midst of all this fear, we need to remember that our God is still the God who always remains faithful to us. With trust in God as our guiding principle, we need to lift one another up and strengthen one another in community, so that together, we might live as people who are not consumed by fear, but by hope.  

The first reading from the Revised Common Lectionary appointed for this 3rd Sunday in Lent comes from the book of Exodus. It tells the story of the people of Israel as they came out of their bondage in Egypt into the wilderness. They left lives that were difficult but now in the wilderness, they faced different sorts of difficulties.  In Egypt they may have been slaves to the Egyptians, but at least, they said, they had plenty of food to eat and water to drink. Now in the wilderness there were periods in which they did not have enough food and water. When they did not have enough food to eat, they complained and grumbled. But God graciously gave them manna to eat so that they did not go hungry. But then the Israelites began to face a period in which they did not have enough water to drink. Once again, they began to quarrel amongst themselves and began to blame not only Moses, their leader, for their difficulties, but also began to blame God.  

“The people quarreled with Moses and said:” 

Give us water to drink.” Moses said to them, “Why do you quarrel with me? Why do you test the Lord?” But the people thirsted there for water; and the people complained against Moses and said, “Why did you bring us out of Egypt, to kill us and our children and livestock with thirst?” So Moses cried out to the Lord, “What shall I do with this people? They are almost ready to stone me.” The Lord said to Moses, “Go on ahead of the people, and take some of the elders of Israel with you; take in your hand the staff with which you struck the Nile, and go. I will be standing there in front of you on the rock at Horeb. Strike the rock, and water will come out of it, so that the people may drink.” Moses did so, in the sight of the elders of Israel.  And there was water enough to drink.”

The passage ends with a very telling sentence.  Moses we are told named, “He called the place Massah and Meribah” [Massah means quarreling.  Meribah means testing] “because the Israelites quarreled and tested the Lord, saying, “Is the Lord among us or not?”  

“Is the Lord among us or not?” 

We Christians are people who have hope. Even in times of gravest difficulty, we are a people of hope. I am reminded of the words of St. Paul from first Thessalonians, chapter 4 in which he is discussing whether the dead will be raised to new life at the resurrection.  It is not the content of that passage that interests me, but the word’s Paul uses to frame his discussion. These are words we need to hear: “We do not want you to be uninformed, so that you may not grieve as others who have no hope.” “So that you may not grieve as others who have no hope.”  We Christians have hope.  We are a people who hope and trust in God even in the most difficult of times. 

In answer to the question, “Is the Lord among us or not?,” our answer is always an emphatic, “yes“.  The Lord is among us even in the most difficult times and circumstances.

When we face difficulties in our lives, we often try to find understanding or meaning in the midst of the things that are happening to us.  Last Sunday, during our church service together, we sang the hymn, “How firm a foundation, ye saints of the Lord.”  After the service, I found myself reciting the lyrics to the hymn from memory because they give me comfort and remind me to trust in God and not live in fear.    

The second verse is particularly relevant and worth reading, praying with, and memorizing.  It is based on scriptural passages and references. It puts the promises of Holy Scripture together in a way that reminds us about the hope that we Christians have.  

2 “Fear not, I am with thee; O be not dismayed!
For I am thy God, and will still give thee aid;
I’ll strengthen thee, help thee, and cause thee to stand,
upheld by my righteous, omnipotent hand.

3 “When through the deep waters I call thee to go,
the rivers of woe shall not thee overflow;
for I will be with thee, thy troubles to bless,
and sanctify to thee thy deepest distress.

4 “When through fiery trials thy pathway shall lie,
my grace, all sufficient, shall be thy supply;
the flame shall not hurt thee; I only design
thy dross to consume, and thy gold to refine.

5 “The soul that to Jesus hath fled for repose,
I will not, I will not desert to its foes;
that soul, though all hell shall endeavor to shake,
I’ll never, no, never, no, never forsake.

[Hymn 637 in The Hymnal 1982

These are words of promise taken from the scripture and put in lyrical form.  

The verse that I say to myself most often the second one.  

2 “Fear not, I am with thee; O be not dismayed!
For I am thy God, and will still give thee aid;
I’ll strengthen thee, help thee, and cause thee to stand,
upheld by my righteous, omnipotent hand.

Is the Lord among us or not?  Yes. The Lord is among us. But in the midst of all this uncertainty, what can we do as faithful Christians?  I have two practical suggestions in this time of difficulty for us today with what we are facing. 

So, what can we do?

The first thing we can do is quite simple. It is to Practice Gratitude. Practicing gratitude helps remind us to keep in mind the things with which God has blessed us. When we practice gratitude, it helps us feel better about ourselves and our situation. When we start to do the opposite and we begin to complain like the Israelites, we lose sight of God.  It’s so easy to complain. It comes naturally to humans. The story of the wandering of the ancient Israelites in the wilderness, as told in the book of Exodus, shows us that the moment they get away from comforts, they begin to complain and murmur and quarrel. What if they instead had practiced gratitude?  “We have been released from Egypt. We are free. Yes, we are facing some difficulties. We don’t have food and water at the moment, but God has always been with us and we will get through this.” What if they had stuck together and worked together in the midst of that? How much stronger they would have been as a community and a people! 

The second practical thing is we need to during this time to figure out ways that we can support one another and connect with one another.  Religious institutions all over the world are trying to figure out how to connect people with one another during this extraordinary time. Many are turning to video conferencing and other forms of technology that help bring us together even as we self-isolate and keep good social distancing.  One tried and true was to keep connected is by telephone. On the telephone you can call your friends, neighbors, and anyone you think might need some assistance or reassurance, and say, “How are you doing?” “What’s going on?” How can I help?”  

So what can we do?

Practice Gratitude.  Give thanks for what we have.  That helps us to remember that we have many, many blessings in our lives.  When we practice gratitude, we find it’s much easier to deal with the difficulties we face.  

The second thing we need to do is to stay connected. The most important thing for us to do at the moment is to try to stay together as a community – even without being able to worship together.  We need to continue to come up with ways to keep us together as a community who will continue to love and praise God and give thanks for God’s many blessings. We all need to help one another as we all go through this time of difficulty and uncertainty.   

“Is the Lord among us or not?” The answer is an emphatic yes!

May the words of this old hymn remind you of the faithfulness of God who promises to always be with us even in the times of deepest trial and difficulty. 

2 “Fear not, I am with thee; O be not dismayed!
For I am thy God, and will still give thee aid;
I’ll strengthen thee, help thee, and cause thee to stand,
upheld by my righteous, omnipotent hand.

3 “When through the deep waters I call thee to go,
the rivers of woe shall not thee overflow….

4 “When through fiery trials thy pathway shall lie,
my grace, all sufficient, shall be thy supply….

One Reply to ““IS THE LORD AMONG US OR NOT?””

  1. Thank you, Craig. It is hard at times such as this to put gratitude first. Your example of what might have happened in the wilderness had gratitude been first (instead of complaining) is well done.

    Ed

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